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Our office was moved to a new address on October 2, 2020. The new address is 2903 Billy Hext Rd, Odessa TX 79765.
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April 2022

Heel pain can be caused by a variety of conditions, with the most common being plantar fasciitis: an inflammation of the plantar fasciitis tissue on the bottom of the foot. Identifying where the pain is specifically located in the heel can sometimes help your podiatrist diagnose your condition. For instance, plantar fasciitis usually causes pain in the bottom/middle of the heel which is at its worst when you first wake up in the morning. Other conditions, such as heel stress fractures, nerve issues, or heel pad atrophy can also cause pain on the bottom of the heel. Pain in the back of the heel may be caused by problems with your Achilles tendon, which connects the heel bone to the calf muscles. These conditions include Achilles tendinopathy/tendinitis, which is usually an overuse injury to the tendon, Haglund’s deformity, which produces a bump at the back of the heel due to shoes exerting pressure on the tendon, and Sever’s disease, which is due to stress on the heel’s growth plate in growing children. Pain in the middle of the heel can sometimes be caused by an entrapped nerve in the ankle (tarsal tunnel syndrome). Sinus tarsi syndrome, typically due to flat feet or following an ankle sprain, can cause pain in the middle/side portion of the heel. Any type of heel pain should be examined by a podiatrist to receive proper diagnosis and treatment.


 

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Hillary Brunner, DPM of Basin Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Odessa, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Wednesday, 20 April 2022 00:00

The Pandemic and Running Injuries

The pandemic prevented many people from engaging in workouts in the gym. Research has shown it may help to begin running slowly on the treadmill before venturing outside on pavement or trails. This may help to prevent running injuries and may be a result of the body warming up to run again. It is suggested that when people resume running outside, the speed and mileage are gradually increased. Covid 19 isolation may have changed people’s running habits, and this may have happened from anxiety, remote work, and schooling. They may have had less time to run than they previously had and may compensate for that by running harder and longer. Wearing shoes that fit correctly and being aware of your running regime is instrumental in preventing running injuries. If you would like information about how running injuries can affect the feet, please consult with a podiatrist, who can recommend additional methods on how to prevent them.

All runners should take extra precaution when trying to avoid injury. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Hillary Brunner, DPM of Basin Podiatry. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

There are a lot of mistakes a runner can make prior to a workout that can induce injury. A lot of athletes tend to overstretch before running, instead of saving those workouts for a post-run routine. Deep lunges and hand-to-toe hamstring pulls should be performed after a workout instead of during a warmup. Another common mistake is jumping into an intense routine before your body is physically prepared for it. You should try to ease your way into long-distance running instead of forcing yourself to rush into it.

More Tips for Preventing Injury

  • Incorporate Strength Training into Workouts - This will help improve the body’s overall athleticism
  • Improve and Maintain Your Flexibility – Stretching everyday will help improve overall performance
  • “Warm Up” Before Running and “Cool Down” Afterward – A warm up of 5-10 minutes helps get rid of lactic acid in the muscles and prevents delayed muscle soreness
  • Cross-Training is Crucial
  • Wear Proper Running Shoes
  • Have a Formal Gait Analysis – Poor biomechanics can easily cause injury

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Odessa, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 12 April 2022 00:00

How to Protect Your Feet as You Age

Foot care gets more inconvenient for the elderly, sometimes because it is just hard to reach your feet, and other times because an underlying condition makes it nearly impossible. There are a few simple ways for the elderly to practice foot care. Because the fatty pads that protect the soles of the feet may have thinned, one way is to wear shoes that fit properly, provide adequate arch support and cushioning for your heels while also avoiding walking barefoot at home. Try not to sit with your feet hanging down for long periods, and instead, keep them elevated as often as possible, especially if you are less active. Exercising the feet and ankles is a good idea in order to keep the blood flowing and reduce swelling. Practice good skin care, such as keeping your feet clean and dry, applying moisturizer to prevent cracked heels, and having calluses removed. Trim toenails straight across, to avoid ingrown nails that can become infected. If your feet are uncommonly cold, seem numb, red, bruised or swollen on a regular basis, or if they have sores that do not heal properly, it is a good idea to consider regular visits to a podiatrist who can keep on top of these symptoms and provide proper treatment before they worsen.

 

Proper foot care is something many older adults forget to consider. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact Hillary Brunner, DPM from Basin Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

The Elderly and Their Feet

As we age we start to notice many changes in our body, but the elder population may not notice them right away. Medical conditions may prevent the elderly to take notice of their foot health right away. Poor vision is a lead contributor to not taking action for the elderly.

Common Conditions 

  • Neuropathy – can reduce feeling in the feet and can hide many life-threatening medical conditions.
  • Reduced flexibility – prevents the ability of proper toenail trimming, and foot cleaning. If left untreated, it may lead to further medical issues.
  • Foot sores – amongst the older population can be serious before they are discovered. Some of the problematic conditions they may face are:
  • Gouging toenails affecting nearby toe
  • Shoes that don’t fit properly
  • Pressure sores
  • Loss of circulation in legs & feet
  • Edema & swelling of feet and ankles

Susceptible Infections

Diabetes and poor circulation can cause general loss of sensitivity over the years, turning a simple cut into a serious issue.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Odessa, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 11 April 2022 00:00

Plantar Warts Can Be Treated!

Plantar warts are small growths that develop on parts of the feet that bear weight. They're typically found on the bottom of the foot. Don't live with plantar warts, and call us today!

Thursday, 07 April 2022 00:00

How to Know if Your Ankle Is Broken

If you sustain an injury to your ankle and wonder whether it is broken or not, you should remain calm and assess your symptoms. A broken ankle is quite painful, especially when you try to move it or put weight on it. The ankle is usually swollen from blood or fluid accumulating at the site of injury and it may be discolored or bruised. Less common symptoms of a broken ankle can be feeling a numb or tingling sensation and/or what is called “crepitus” or a feeling of bone grinding on bone when the ankle is manipulated. Beyond a bone sticking out of the flesh, the only way to know for sure if you have a broken ankle is to obtain an X-ray or bone scan. If the ankle is broken, these diagnostic tests will show that something is out of place. A CT scan or MRI may be ordered to determine the severity of the break. It is vital to see a podiatrist if you have injured your ankle as this professional can order the appropriate test and proceed to treat the fracture or whatever condition might be identified.

Broken ankles need immediate treatment. If you are seeking treatment, contact Hillary Brunner, DPM from Basin Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet. 

Broken Ankles
A broken ankle is experienced when a person fractures their tibia or fibula in the lower leg and ankle area. Both of these bones are attached at the bottom of the leg and combine to form what we know to be our ankle.

When a physician is referring to a break of the ankle, he or she is usually referring to a break in the area where the tibia and fibula are joined to create our ankle joint. Ankles are more prone to fractures because the ankle is an area that suffers a lot of pressure and stress. There are some obvious signs when a person experiences a fractured ankle, and the following symptoms may be present.

Symptoms of a Fractured Ankle

  • Excessive pain when the area is touched or when any pressure is placed on the ankle
  •  Swelling around the area
  •  Bruising of the area
  • Area appears to be deformed

If you suspect an ankle fracture, it is recommended to seek treatment as soon as possible. The sooner you have your podiatrist diagnose the fracture, the quicker you’ll be on the way towards recovery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Odessa, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about All About Broken Ankles
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